The Latest and Greatest



Picture Books and Middle Readers




Tweens




Teens




The Elf Shelf



Not to be confused with the Elf on the Shelf… Our “Elf Shelf” is a list of new books that belong on the shelves of happy, smiling, and well-deserving children, such as yours (as observed by the Elf on the Shelf of course). Here are the lists of handpicked books by Bibliotechies’ extraordinaire, Liz. Find the appropriate age groups and click on the book in the carousel that peaks your interest.



Picture Books and Books for Emerging Readers




Middle Readers




Tween




Young Adult Literature



National Book Award Winner



Young People’s Literature


Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father.

Liz says:

As Caitlyn struggles to deal with the tragic death of her older brother, she must face her own difficulties of understanding the world and relating to others. Ultimately, Caitlyn learns the true meaning of closure and empathy as she connects, in her own way, to her family, friends and community. This is a beautiful, sensitive story; a little gem.


Reluctant Readers


Do you have a child who hates to read?

We’ve just started to put together lists of surefire hits for even the most reluctant Tween and Teen readers.

These books are short, funny or edgy and kids love them!

We will be building these lists so watch for new additions and please let us know if you’d like a personalized list.

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BookClubTips


Fun and Serious
There should be enough pressure to finish a book without feeling like you’re under an enormous time crunch. Try meeting every 6-8 weeks instead of every month.


Structure and Flexibility
Structure the meeting so that people feel relaxed and have time to socialize but make sure time is designated for the book discussion. Too much book talk may feel imposing but too little will feel like you’re not actually in a book group. We socialize for about an hour over cocktails, then we sit down to dinner and talk about the book. By the time we’re ready for dessert we’re back to socializing!


Effort vs. Ease
We meet on Sunday evenings from roughly 5-8pm. Typically we each host about once every 12-18 months so there isn’t too much pressure. The host provides the main course and everyone else brings appetizers, side dishes, desserts, wine, etc.


Size Matters
We have about 12 members and typically 8-10 people come to a meeting.


How Bibliotechies Can Help
Send us the list of books that you have read as an archive
Send us your latest picks and we will upload with a direct link for the members to purchase directly through Amazon.
The link will also include a comment section for you to continue your discussion online or add your 2 cents if you can’t make the meeting.
Check out other people’s lists for ideas or to comment on books that you have read.
See Liz’s book group for a sample.

If you are not on our email list be sure to subscribe to get more information.


2010 Award Winners



And the winners are… We guessed it! Check out the 2010 American Library Association literary award winners.


WINNERS

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On January 11th, The New York Times reported that today’s teens are dealing with more mental health issues now than during The Great Depression. Reading stories that deal with emotional and behavioral issues may help kids who are struggling as they help them to think about, process and understand their own concerns. These books may also give parents the opportunity to discuss tough topics in a non-threatening way.

Young Adult Books Dealing with Mental Health Issues

Wintergirls

Black Box

Fat Kid Rules The World

Feeling Sorry For Celia

The Earth, My Butt and Other Big Round Things

Stop Pretending


Giving Voice to Autism


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According to the organization Autism Speaks, about 1 in 150 children are autistic. It is the goal of this organization to promote research, awareness, advocacy and family services.


AUTISM SPEAKS | BE INFORMED | GET INVOLVED | WALK EVENTS | DONATE


In addition to the good work of this group and others like it, there is another powerful way in which Autism is being given a voice.


Autism in Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork

Anything But Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin

London Eye Mystery by Siobhan Dowd

Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko

Al Capone Shines My Shoes by Gennifer Choldenko

Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine


The Choice Is Yours


We have always believed that giving kids reading choices is the best way to encourage them to love reading. Apparently, we are not the only ones. According to a recent New York Times article, “A New Assignment: Pick Books You Like,” letting students make their own selections helps “to build a lifelong love of reading.”

NYT ARTICLE

Bibliotechies

Bibliotechies

It is not enough to simply teach children to read; we have to give them something worth reading.

-Katherine Paterson

Latest Update: Dec 9th, 2010 at 14:04

New Book on the Blog

Mockingbird by Kathryn Erskine

Ten-year-old Caitlin, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, struggles to understand emotions, show empathy, and make friends at school, while at home she seeks closure by working on a project with her father.
Liz says:
As Caitlyn struggles to deal with the tragic death of her older brother, she must face her own difficulties of understanding the [...]

Posted in 2010 Awards, Liz Loves, National Book Award 2010, You Go Girl by carascherzer
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